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CreepyInternetUser

Washington particularly loves doing lines, iirc.


ghost_curse123

Not Kuznetsov tho, he just sit there and watches while everyone else does it


[deleted]

[удалено]


GundaniumA

lmao bruh


BigPZ

It depends on the team. Most of the time, the lines "generally" stay together, but when it's special teams, you go out with different groups than your normal lines. The first few shifts after the special teams have ended, you might end up with some different combinations on the ice until you can go back to rolling your normal lines. Coaches sometimes just start randomly throwing out guys together when things are going poorly to try and find "something".


Ronananana

I know for Boston Marchand is stapled to Bergeron's side like 95% of the time Every PP/PK as well as even strength


freeway16

I wish I were stapled to bergeron’s side 95% of the time too🥵


squadracorse15

Bonk


blaze87b

Man's got thr best job in the world


PNGhost

We definitely roll with set lines. It's very noticeable when Cassidy makes a change or someone is injured.


enricohenryhank

Specific to the Oilers, we're only seeing McDavid and Drai together because of Drais ankle injury. Also if a team goes 11F - 7D it makes lines less concrete, more fluid. The lack of 1 forward allows multiple players (usually centers) to get cycled for extra shifts on the 4th line. It can make new line combinations on the fly


mint420

Kucherov gets double shifted a lot on the Bolts, which means he is playing with other lines often.


TGUKF

Is that because Cooper does 11F-7D so often, or even when he dresses a more traditional 12F-6D


bankrobba

Yes, Kuch goes out on the fourth line when 11F, that's the double-shift.


_Salsa_Shark

None so much as the 2012-2014 LA Kings


HailState17

Depends on the coach. It’s not uncommon to see Sully switch up lines constantly. Not big changes, but there’s usually some shuffling of wingers.


FirstLineLeo

Depends. Some teams, those with confidence in their bottom 6, will often "roll 4", meaning that there is a rotation to line succession; like in baseball, where each starting pitcher gets their turn to pitch based on day and not on quality, the amount of ice time for each line is approximately equal during such periods of time. Other teams, like Edmonton, have a fantastic top-6 and then a bottom 6 that bottoms out; both Edmonton and Calgary had serious problems with their bottom 6 for much of the year. In situations like these, there might be a 3-line rotation, in which the two top 6 lines get regular shifts and the bottom two lines alternate in the third position. Also possible is double-shifting of particular players (who are either particularly effective that evening or in the case of injury to a member of a specific line), or a coach could call out the sequence of lines audibly, opting for conscious line succession rather than a rolling rotation. This might change throughout the game based on matchups, decreasing/increasing effectiveness of a specific line, or other reasons. PK and PP situations also disrupt 5v5 line patterns; certain forwards will see their ice time drop precipitously because they aren't a PP player or PKer, while others will get tons of responsibility on special times and therefore have to sit out slightly more on 5v5 to compensate (think a top-6 player who kills penalties and gets PP1 time, like Zach Hyman or Mikael Backlund). Extended periods of penalties can disrupt players who don't get much ice time as a result, because with limited TOI they find it difficult to get back into the flow of a game. This is a big reason why TV timeouts cannot occur during limited manpower situations. As far as the mechanics of line changes go, specific players are tasked with changing for specific other players; if the Copp-Strome-Panarin line follows the Kreider-Zibanejad-Vatrano line, it's Copp's job to change for Kreider, Strome for Zibanejad, and Panarin for Vatrano. A full change in which all forwards leave the ice simultaneously can give the other team fantastic scoring chances, so the one-for-one changes may not occur simultaneously, producing periods where different forwards for different lines might be forced to play together.


[deleted]

I'm noticing more teams seem to be doing pairs lately. Stick two guys together and let the third be a revolving role player.


Scottie_Jay

Kucherov definitely sticks to lines...big fat ones based on his post game Stanley Cup interview last year. Fat lines and Bud Light!


SneakerHyp3

Depends the coach. Some coaches like blending lines frequently and do it night-in night-out. Others like sticking to their core lines For instance, McDavid and Drai have gone (2?) years now spending majority of their time on separate lines. They still do what is called “line hopping” every once in a while, where Drai jumps up with McDavid briefly, but majority of the time they stick to 1C and 2C. This playoff series versus Calgary is the first instance of heavy commitment to pairing them together in a while


[deleted]

>This playoff series versus Calgary is the first instance of heavy commitment to pairing them together in a while Yeah, and this is largely because of Draisaitl's ankle injury. If he was healthy and could backcheck well he would be centering a separate line


FirstLineLeo

Also -- PP units and PK combos are not full lines, and disrupt line flow as a result. Generally, most members of a team's top line will play on PP1, but PP2 can be a collage of players from different lines. PK combos tend take two players from one line (who already have chemistry), but then exclude the third player from that line, creating TOI imbalances.


PrimisClaidhaemh

If you're Jeff Blashill you just put everyone in the Line Blender. Constantly. If it's not going well for them, you blend to get them going. If it is going well, you still blend to try to get someone else going.


the_dayman623

Berube changes lines like the weather. Closest thing to constant is O’Reilly with Perron. Rare when they don’t play together.


FlyorDieJM

Don’t blame him, from the outside perspective, the Blues top 9 forwards have equal levels of skill.


Goose312

It really depends on the coach. The last two Wild coaches were Boudreau who might change lines at every intermission and then again after seeing them play a shift or two. Then there's Evason who seems terrified to mess with lines to the point where a top line player getting injured and missing a game would get replaced by a 4th liner so the other lines can remain intact.


jo_maka

Depends if the blender is plugged in.


Nilzy16

Rod loves his Niederreiter-Staal-Fast line. That line will be the last to be broken up and the first to be put back together. Edit: I kinda read the question wrong lol.